Superposing the city

  • Publish On 30 October 2017
  • Yann Moulier-Boutang
  • 5 minutes

Yann Moulier-Boutang is an economist and essayist, professor at the université de technologie de Compiègne, Binghamton University in New York, and Shanghai UTSEUS University, Complexcity Laboratory. The consequences of cognitive capitalism – the shift towards a pollination and contribution economy – is one of its main areas of research.
He describes here the impact of this paradigm shift on city planning and contemporary architecture.

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